DC Read-A-Thon: Batman and The Outsiders #1: The Bat-Rebellion

Batman and The Outsiders #1 Cover DC Comics

Copyright: DC Comics

Welcome to the DC Read-A-Thon of Batman and The Outsiders! With the announcement of the full roster of Steve Orlando and Ivan Reis’s Justice League of America, the team had a different feel to it. The team seemed all over the place, Vixen, Ryan Choi’s Atom, The Ray, Killer Frost, then you get Black Canary, Lobo, and Batman. Now here’s what caught my eye about the team further, they announced a trade of Batman and The Outsiders. Batman leading a team that seems like a mish-mash of DC everything gives this a nice Outsiders feel. It got me to thinking, I have all the issues so why not start reading it? Hence the beginning of the Batman and The Outsiders DC Read-A-Thon. Without further ado, here is Batman and The Outsiders #1!

Welcome to the Great Bat-Rebellion!

What makes this series so fascinating is how it is structured from the get go. It all begins as Batman is working himself to the bone to protect Gotham City. It’s where I like where Mike W. Barr takes this, it’s a good structure for Batman. He’s sending off Lucius Fox on a journey to Markovia but his mind is elsewhere in his battles within Gotham City. These battles are also fraying Batman as his secret identity as Bruce Wayne. Happy for his friend but still can’t dwell on his friend leaving as he’s got his own war to fight. Even more clever is Barr puts in two days worth of storytelling condensed within a short burst of panels. That’s all it takes and then it is off to set up Batman and the Outsiders.

Batman and The Outsiders #1 48 Hours

Copyright: DC Comics

Many of you saw Markovia and those familiar with Markovia probably had a, “Oh wow it all began there?!” moment. Lucius Fox goes missing in that country and Batman decides to call to the Justice League of America to help him out. To keep it short and sweet, Batman doesn’t get the help of the Justice League. The Government tells the League to stay out of it and as you figure, Batman isn’t happy at all about this. Which leads to Batman tendering his resignation to the Justice League, which you can imagine was huge back then.  Batman decides then and there he’s going to save his friend Lucius without the help of the League. Leading to a great explanation of Batman in the midst of a few panels and sets the stage perfectly for what’s to come.

This page is Classic Batman.

Batman and The Outsiders #1 Batman Reasons for Resigning

Copyright: DC Comics

Now we hang our hats fully in Markovia from here on for the rest of the issue. A big part of this issue is this is the set up for Brion becoming Geo-Force, who’s the half-brother of Tara a.k.a Terra from Teen Titans. My favorite part is how Tara and Brion became brother and sister, bless you back matter. Truncating the editorial somewhat, Mike W. Barr had a chat with Marv Wolfman about his new character Geo-Force having earth powers and Marv wondered if Barr had been reading his New Teen Titans. Marv had Terra with earth powers running around in those pages, but Marv figured he could come up with something. I couldn’t do justice to Barr’s hilarious rantings but the short version is, Marv said “they are brother and sister” and the rest is history. Now back to the issue.

Apologies for that quick digression in this Batman and The Outsiders Read-A-Thon, but it is a cool story.

This is honestly my first time ever seeing the origin of Geo-Force and that is the best bit of this for me. It’s sad to see Brion/Geo-Force and his brother Prince Gregor’s father die but then Dr. Jace comes into play. She’s cranky but oddly fun, I think of her as the prototype for Dr. Nemesis in the X-Men. She’s the one who gives Brion his Geo-Force powers to help save the country. Gregor has his doubts but knows that he couldn’t stop his brother anyway. Barr has a great way of handling a death, setting up an origin, and showing relationships of characters within two pages. That’s remarkable and it doesn’t feel rushed at all. It keeps up the strong flow of the story as soon many new and old characters come into play.

Geoforce Origin Batman and the Outsiders #1

Copyright: DC Comics

Here’s the even better part about Batman’s Markovian adventure. Every member of The Outsiders is set in place by the end of the issue. No Batman gathering the troops or anything else, quick set up for Black Lightning and everyone else gets explained throughout the rest of the issue. Black Lightning got a cool moment dealing with one member of the invading force, but that went haywire and fast. The only other characters who get any major explanation is Halo, who Batman finds within Markovia, Geo-Force, and Metamorpho. Katana gets a quick appearance, does some damage, and off to the races. It’s cool to know where everyone stands though in a relatively quick fashion in the second half of the issue.

Old school and awesome, this is why I dig the Geo-Force origin.

Batman and the Outsiders Geoforce Origin Part Two

Copyright: DC Comics

The Halo origin is still early days, hard to judge as to where that will go but the Geo-Force origin is wonderful. Geo-Force is a classic old school style origin and it’s about as good as you can get. That’s when you get Metamorpho involved as he’s there to meet the good Dr. Jace to help him out, which gets messed up by the invasion force. Geo-Force gets taken out but hey, he’s a main member of the team you think he’s out for long? While Batman is taking care of Halo and she’s along for the ride until he gets knocked out himself by our unknown force. That’s when we finally see Lucius Fox, Black Lightning, and what’s left of Metamorpho after his battle, and now Batman meets Baron Bedlam. Which sets up the next issue.

Baron Bedlam Batman and The Outsiders #1

Copyright: DC Comics

Mike W. Barr is amazing in structuring the series so far, it’s smooth to read and the concept gets set up at hyper speed. It’s an absolute delight to read, characters work well, and it flows pretty nicely for the most part. The major establishing point was the why and how of Batman putting this team together, Barr nails this without any problem and that’s what makes this fun. It’s got its share of quirks but in a good way. It’s just weird enough and it works with a slight bit more of an edge while still being within the Comics Code Authority. Yes kids, Comics Code Authority, it existed and wow people found strange and wonderful ways to work around it. Batman and The Outsiders had a different feel to it and I dig that.

Made a point to sneak this in as I got a major kick out of these panels.

Bruce Wayne or Batman in Batman and The Outsiders #1

Copyright: DC Comics

Take a look at the art I post in this too, Jim Aparo’s art on Batman and The Outsiders is amazing. Aparo and Barr are the co-creators on this series and you can tell they are going for broke here storytelling wise. Aparo’s art is off the charts, it looks great. There’s emotion flowing through each of the characters in actions, movement, and excellent facial expressions. There’s so much life in this comic and that helps give it that different feel from a lot of team series. Aparo and Barr are both showing they want this series to feel different and it does feel different. I’ve also never appreciated the coloring of this period until I noticed what Adrienne Roy did here. Roy’s coloring is mood setting, especially in the post-resignation scene from the League. That scene showing why Batman had to leave fired on all cylinders.

It’s interesting to me when you have artists you never quite pay attention to until you start to really look at something. That was me and Jim Aparo here. I’ve always liked Barr’s stuff, Camelot 3000 and some of the Warlord stuff I’ve read, but this is next level appreciation here. The work with Halo, the set up for why Metamorpho was there, and just everything with this team build up was solid stuff. Wow this is going to be a fun read-a-thon.

Join me as I dive into Batman and The Outsiders further, I’ve never read this and this is a joy to read thus far. Till next issue, thanks for checking out my recap here. Bye for now!

 

Wes Reads DC: Deathstroke #1-2: Brutal Brilliance!

Deathstroke #1 Cover

Copyright: DC Comics

After my glowing look at Deathstroke: Rebirth I was hesitant to do another piece on this series. After reading the first two issues of the ongoing, I had to say something. Consider this a slight bit of review but more, here is why I like this. Christopher Priest with the Rebirth issue brought back an extra sense of grit to the DC Universe. Deathstroke’s world isn’t a nice one and as Priest expands on it, the comic is that much better. I won’t be going on a spoiler spree here with this piece so you can read on with peace. A non-stop brutal and violent wonderland awaits you in exploring the life of Slade Wilson. As a comic series, Deathstroke doesn’t shy away from the darkness and that’s wonderful. Read on, join me in my adventure into Deathstroke #1-2.

By the time this is through, you will likely be snagging the first two issues at hyper speed.

Deathstroke #2 DC Rebirth Cover

Copyright: DC Comics

One aspect of DC that I appreciate is how when it does gritty, it does gritty. Deathstroke is a weird character for DC as they’ve never been sure how to portray him. DC was wanting to make him their next antihero and that never gelled as a concept for the most part. The Deathstroke that works is one that portrays Slade Wilson has a terrible person and that’s fine. These two issues continue exploring how dark Slade’s world really is. What I like about Priest’s portrayal of Slade is how he fleshes him out as a character. There’s an understanding as to why he is the way he is. Slade Wilson is Deathstroke, he’s not good, bad, he’s Deathstroke and hopefully you’re not the person he’s after.

Deathstroke doesn’t live in a pretty world, but it is a fascinating one.

Deathstroke #1 Assassin Splash

Copyright: DC Comics

Now we’re dealing with yet another tweak of Slade Wilson’s family but I hope this is the one that sticks. There’s a nice dynamic as to how Slade’s family works from the past with his wife, to his daughter from another woman. Priest deals with all this in a matter of fact way. Even the people in his supporting cast, especially Wintergreen say Slade is not a nice person. It is also shown though if you’re in a firefight, Slade Wilson is a good person to have at your side. He’s not the best friend, he’s not a great dad, not a great husband, but an amazing warrior.

Deathstroke: Terrible Person, Best Fighter Around, That’s Slade Wilson.

Deathstroke #2 Slade Wilson Battle

Copyright: DC Comics

I like how Priest is building Slade up at this point with his adversaries. For a new reader, the new Deathstroke series is a primer on Slade Wilson. If you want to know how he’d handle a non-powered to a super powered character, this is it.  So far this series is keeping Slade Wilson grounded for all the best reasons, making for great storytelling opportunities. Right now the story is someone is after Slade and it’s not clear who it is. There’s one big reveal at the end of issue two that sets up a lot of possibilities for who could be after him. We’re only at part three here and I know there’s more to come. The hits just keep on coming for Slade Wilson.

As the issues go on you learn more about Slade’s family life too and it gets messed up, fast. Every writer at some point or another has a take on Slade Wilson’s family. To be honest from all that I know, this is ten shades of awful, then again this is Slade. All of Slade’s family life takes place in the past and it makes you wonder how this will sort itself out. Priest’s way of jumping between the past and the present as a storytelling technique works wonders here. The layers to this series building within these issues and the Rebirth issue is phenomenal.

There is even more to say here for sure, Deathstroke is just that good.

Now take note as I talk about the story happening here, Deathstroke’s art team is incredible.  In my Deathstroke: Rebirth article I rave a lot about the art team and it all applies here too, such amazing work. In #2 the team of Carlo Pagulayan, Jason Paz, Jeromy Cox, and Willie Schubert get another addition, Larry Hama on breakdowns. Hama is a perfect fit for Deathstroke’s world. Pagulayan’s pencil work and Paz’s inking were great, but Hama adds another element to Deathstroke. It’s noticeable how the storytelling got that much tighter with Hama’s breakdowns. Priest has a team here that has shown that they bring his vision to life with sheer ease. It’s exquisite.

This my friends, summing up two issues of Deathstroke, Simply Put, Buy This.

I could go on even more about Deathstroke but it would be overkill. A genuine blast of a book that will keep you engaged for the entire time reading it and you will want more. One of the best in the DC Rebirth line that deserves all the attention it can get. Slade Wilson is a terrible person but as Deathstroke, a terrible person makes for a fascinating series. Buy this comic.

 

 

 

 

Wes Reads: Doom Patrol #1: Young Animal Arrives!

Doom Patrol #1 Young Animal DC Comics Cover

Copyright: DC Comics

Doom Patrol is the start of the Young Animal Imprint at DC Comics. Gerard Way unleashes his distinctive vision for Young Animal within the pages of Doom Patrol. Way’s writing on Doom Patrol gives you an idea of what to expect out of Young Animal. If this is what Young Animal has in store for us, this line of comics will be amazing. I’m part of the crowd with Doom Patrol, I like this comic. The tagline for Young Animal is “Comics for Dangerous Humans”, this fits in a good way here. In every review and opinion I’ve read, all across social media, everyone likes this comic. Here’s where this gets fun, why is it so loved? I’m going to give you my personal reasons why I like this comic as much as I do. To the land of the weird and wonderful with Doom Patrol #1!

Enter the Gyro, You never know what you will find.

Doom Patrol #1 Young Animal Gyro

Copyright: DC Comics

 

As the comic explores about a thousand different concepts in one issue, this is surprisingly friendly to a new reader. Gerard Way sets up the concept as if you know next to nothing about the team you’ll be fine. Now if you know a little to a lot about Doom Patrol then it becomes that much richer for you. Way’s Doom Patrol can be appreciated on any level. My level of Doom Patrol knowledge is moderate but I am weak in my knowledge of Morrison’s run on the series which seems to be a heavy influence here. If you haven’t read any of Morrison’s Doom Patrol, you’ll still be fine. Ideas come at you in many ways here and this is a blast to read no matter what.

You can say that Doom Patrol is Weird but a Good Kind of Weird.

Note the heading, yes this is weird but I am so glad it exists. Casey Brinkle helps in being your guide to the madness around her. No matter what kind of weirdness and craziness comes at you, Way lets Casey be your guide to Doom Patrol. People start exploding, no problem, Casey centers the comic. Gyros being their own worlds, no problem, Casey gives you a way to process this in your mind. Sometimes there are comics out there that throw weird out there just to be weird, this is weird with purpose. Casey is the viewpoint for the new readers while the old readers wonder how she fits in. Casey Brinkle works on both levels and Way makes it seem effortless but the thought behind her shows.

From what I can tell, the Doom Patrol is forming around Casey and she’s become a magnet for weird in the process. In the meantime, while the Doom Patrol is coming back to the scene, there’s something behind the scenes perking up. A strange new food sensation is starting up that is going to factor in amazing and odd ways it seems. The people behind this new food sensation are a nightmare fuel corporate group, while still being slick and shiny. I got a NextWave vibe off of them as to how they acted mixed in with a lot of horrifying corporate focus group shows. Even better that this group is discussing the food in a run of the mill hotel, perfection.

Seriously, Absolute Perfection.

There’s so much to this one issue of Doom Patrol and yet it is still easy to piece it together. Robot Man appears and then has something bonkers happen from the start, which adds another element to the story. I am intrigued by Terry None, that intro was the most off the wall thing but Casey’s reaction to Terry made it priceless. Even more curious as what Robot Man was up to before certain events happened to him. Way even addresses Niles Caulder, the founder of the Doom Patrol, in a random one pager, and it all makes sense. There’s so much meat to this comic and so much going on that I can’t imagine what will happen next.

Where’s the Kaboom? Well right on the image below you can see the kaboom.

Doom Patrol #1 Birthday

Copyright: DC Comics

I haven’t even touched the art on this yet, which is amazing in itself!

Attempting a story such as this requires an art team up to making this vision work. Nick Derrington, Tamra Bonvillain, and Todd Klein are beyond up to the task. Derrington’s art on this is without a doubt phenomenal. The art here captures so much in the emotions of the characters and making this wonderland of madness seem tactile. Way’s story blends the weird and wonderful together swimmingly with Derrington being the one to bring and enhance the world of the Doom Patrol and Derrington does that with perfection.

The Expression on the Cat alone makes it all the more special.

Derrington’s art is only part of what makes Gerard Way’s Doom Patrol great, it’s also the coloring that makes the comic shine. Tamra Bonvillain’s coloring is a masterwork. Bonvillain’s coloring on the Robot Man scenes in the Gyro world are impressive. That painted look to those pages that Derrington drew gives it a unique style all on its own. That’s not to say that the rest of the coloring here isn’t impressive, it’s pure beauty that can’t help but make anyone smile. A bright palette for a strange and sparkly world.

You also can’t help but get a kick out of this page showing the brilliance of all involved with this.

Doom Patrol #1 DC Comics Young Animal Blast

Copyright: DC Comics

Todd Klein’s lettering on this is as amazing as anything else he’s ever done. He’s a legend in the comics industry and Klein makes this book sing through his letters. Unique stylings with an unleashed brilliance to match with Way’s off the wall storytelling. It’s quirky, fun, and engaging lettering, making the lettering as much a part of the art process as anything else. It’s delightful and some of the coolest stuff I have seen in awhile.

Young Animal is going to be a brilliant imprint.

Simply put, buy this comic. If you somehow have managed to miss this book then correct that mistake and read it. We could use more of this madness in comics. A great start for the Young Animal imprint and I’m excited for what’s to come for this series and with the imprint itself.

 

 

DC Extreme: Extreme Justice #3: A Fall Before the Storm

Extreme Justice #3 Cover DC Comics

Copyright: DC Comics

Extreme Justice #3, yes my friends we are at #3 of the DC Extreme Adventure. Extreme Justice #3 is the conclusion to the first story of this series. At points, this has been a frustrating arc but a fun one. Outside of #0 which gives little to nothing to go on for the series, the rest of the arc got much better over time. Now we near the end of this first adventure.  Hopefully, this issue will continue the upward trend I’ve seen within Extreme Justice thus far. As #2 ended, our heroes were fighting the Beta Team. The battle is the epitome of it’s always darkest before the dawn, the dawn, in this case, being Captain Atom. Captain Atom is back and he’s raring to do some damage to the enemy. Let the battle continue on as we see how this story arc ends in Extreme Justice #3!

The Battle Rages On as Extreme Justice #3 Begins with an Angry Captain Atom!

 

Extreme Justice #3: Captain Atom Returns!

Copyright: DC Comics

That image is the perfect opening shot for this article. Yes, I am playing with the format but for an opening shot that cool, worth it. As this page sets up a comic that goes at full speed without stopping for a minute. Even in the quiet moments, there’s always some kind of action going on. If ever you could say one comic is nothing but high octane action, this is it. Dan Vado went for writing a big splashy finish to the first storyline and it accomplished that. It gave Marc Campos, Ken Branch, and Lee Loughridge a lot to work with. Campos goes with pure dynamic layouts in the fight scenes giving added energy to even the quietest moments in between. Branch adds a strong line to make the fight scenes that much stronger with a bold line. Add in Loughridge’s popping coloring and you have a party.

One of my favorite panels, a cool punch will always win me over. Stylized and Awesome.

Extreme Justice #3 Amazing-Man Punch!

Copyright: DC Comics

Vado veered towards giving the art team a chance to show off, which in theory isn’t a bad idea. You get the powerhouse return of Captain Atom and he’s not slowing down for anyone. It also let the team have some fun moments too so that’s cool. There are many creative and exciting pages with everything but the kitchen sink thrown at the team. With all of this happening it doesn’t give much time for the final part of the story to breathe. I like a good high-intensity finale but this was a little much. In my case, I now get to figure out how to make this digestible for you and for me. Let’s get this part of the party started.

In the land of revelations, I was wrong about The Beta Team. They weren’t robots, they were grown soldiers to help out General/Mister Synge in his campaign. Synge’s campaign is for Freedom, think every nutty conspiracy you’ve ever seen or heard, that’s Synge’s campaign. A little over simplified but the comic only gives a loose depiction of it anyway. This all comes at you at rapid-fire and Vado doesn’t really explore everything. Hence why I feel the story is rushed, also makes my frustrations over #0 that much more pronounced as that issue could have been used to better effect.

Cool art is one thing but give me some genuine payoff to a storyline, please.

With every revelation, the Beta Team eventually betraying Mister Synge and his conversation with Captain Atom has little effect. It’s weird that all these big climatic reveals and eventual death of Mister Synge, and I felt nothing. There are cool character moments with Amazing-Man and the rest of the cast which redeems the issue. If it wasn’t for Vado’s handling of the team and the fun art, this would have been tougher to read, to say the least.

After all that though there’s a spark of life at the end of the tunnel. In a weird sense it feels as though Vado set up this action packed but overall meaningless arc for one reason. The reason being, Firestorm. That’s right the Firestorm story with Ronnie Raymond finally kicks into high gear. The situation has become grim with Ronnie and his leukemia. Nothing is working to help treat it and Ronnie is feeling hopeless.  That’s until the big payoff kicks into gear and our next story begins. Firestorm has arrived into the Extreme Justice Universe! Bless you Dan Vado, bless you.

All it took was for me to see the final page and I am already excited for what’s to come.

Firestorm Returns: Extreme Justice #3

Copyright: DC Comics

That’s story arc one in the books for Extreme Justice and the DC Extreme reading journey. I’m already working on how to set up the next issue as you read this. Until next time, thanks for reading and always remember, stay Extreme!

If you’re just starting the Extreme Justice Journey, feel free to catch up with the links below.

DC Extreme: Exploring Extreme Justice #0: Hello 90’s!

DC Extreme: Extreme Justice #1: It Makes Sense!

DC Extreme: Extreme Justice #2: Yay Character Development!

DC Extreme: Extreme Justice #2: Yay Character Development!

Extreme Justice #2 Cover DC Comics

Copyright: DC Comics

Back to the DC Extreme Universe with Extreme Justice #2! After the events of Extreme Justice #1, life is tense for our new team. First of all, Captain Atom is out of the picture. For a team to be successful it needs some kind of leader. Any other team would have called it a day after that. Of course, this team is made of sterner stuff and they have a job to do. The mystery of Mount Thunder intensifies in #2. Our Beta Team pals are only the beginning of the craziness lying within this hostile new headquarters. Our story is starting to heat up now. What will Extreme Justice do now without Captain Atom? Will the team survive his loss? Let the mystery be revealed as I venture forth into Extreme Justice #2.

I feel my desire for Crystal Pepsi rising as I return to Extreme Justice once more.

In adventures of Extreme Justice, this issue is the toughest to get a handle on. General Synge has one big evil villain moment but that’s about it for him in this issue. In all honesty, I was this close to combining this one with #3 and calling it a day. As per anything in this crazy universe of ours, something within this issue struck me. One special aspect that I’d been clamoring for since #0, character development. What’s frustrating for me as a reader of Extreme Justice so far is characters, namely Maxima and Amazing-Man, getting little to no development. Oh sure Maxima and Amazing-Man have things to do but even Booster Gold was lost in the shuffle too. Extreme Justice is the Blue Beetle and Captain Atom show at this stage of the game. Dan Vado knocking Captain Atom out of commission gives the team the development they need.

Extreme Justice #2 Aftermath

Copyright: DC Comics

A lesson for Extreme Justice: Character Development is Beautiful.

In any good team book, the key is to make every member of the group feel necessary. While Vado has each of the characters showing off a skill or two, they never seem to gel as a team. By the end of this issue, Extreme Justice begins to become a true team comic. Character development, it’s a magical thing. Even the bad guys get a moment of character development. The Beta Team robots that General Synge controls start to show personality. Synapse is the head robot over the robots in Beta Team called Kill-Units, but they don’t really want to kill. A nice twist on the formula of robot killers of the period, of course, Synapse is a jerk and zaps a Kill-Unit showing doubt in the mission. Heroes and Villains getting character development, I love it.

Extreme Justice: Giving me a dose of wonderful robot fights, so many robot fights.

Extreme Justice #2 Blue Beetle vs. Robots

Copyright: DC Comics

As we dive into the rest of the issue, our team gels together personality wise and now they can become a fighting force. Of course, even as they get over the hump of Amazing-Man doubts and more issues, they are dealing with a tough foe. One thing about Captain Atom, he’s tough as nails to kill if anything he’s nigh impossible to kill. Since he is also the official leader of the team as you know and I know, Captain Atom returns at the end. How does he return? The mystery will have to be revealed at a later date as that’s how Extreme Justice #2 ends.

This is a shorter recap of Extreme Justice than I’d like but that’s because there’s not a lot of big moments here. Marc Campos and Ken Branch were given many chances to show off at least. In between the short but needed character development Vado put in, this was a heavy action issue. I get the feeling Vado knew this could have been a slow issue so he piled on the action and it worked. The simple bits work in a comic at points, just enough character and a ridiculous amount of robot fighting. I am but a simple man and Extreme Justice plays to it in this issue.

As always thank you all for your support in my Extreme Justice adventures. Until next time, make sure to tune to this GWL Station and as I return with Extreme Justice #3!

 

If this is your first DC Extreme Justice adventure, never fear! Look below to catch up with the rest of the adventure!

DC Extreme: Exploring Extreme Justice #0: Hello 90’s!

DC Extreme: Extreme Justice #1: It Makes Sense!

 

DC Extreme: Extreme Justice #1: It Makes Sense!

Extreme Justice #1 Cover DC Comics

Copyright: DC Comics

Welcome back to the ongoing mission to read the entire series of Extreme Justice. Here we are at #1 of the somewhat remembered Justice League series. Extreme Justice had a rocky start with #0 notably making me wonder about this comic in the first place. Moments of cool are one thing, but there has to be a reason to care about a series. The cast is likable enough. Captain Atom is a good team leader. You even have a version of the classic Blue and Gold/Blue Beetle and Booster Gold duo here too. With Maxima and Amazing Man having trouble finding their place in Extreme Justice at this stage. So what will happen from here? Only one way to find out. Time to see what is in store for our Extreme Team as we head into Extreme Justice #1.

Time to get our Extreme 90’s Caps on!

Last issue in Extreme Justice Mount Thunder was introduced into the series. This from what I’m seeing will be the headquarters of our series. As this issue starts to give more background into how big the place is. There’s more details on the villain of the piece, Mister or should I say, General Synch revealed too. Synch is in charge of Mount Thunder and isn’t happy that our team is there. Turns out Mount Thunder is a massive complex; one place in particular called The Neighborhood is revealed in this issue. Synch is now trying to get the team out of there, one way or another. Which gives us a fun few pages as we start off the issue the first team gets more than they bargained for. Let’s just say, Captain Atom knows how to avoid a useless fight.

Sometimes in comics avoiding the ridiculous fight is a good thing.

This is the issue where Captain Atom gets some strong development as the leader of the team. Vado establishes why Captain Atom is the leader of Extreme Justice. One of Atom’s old friend’s is in charge of the group sent into Mount Thunder, a man by the name of Crater. Crater doesn’t want to really have this fight but he’s just following orders. Of course another person tries to go after Atom as Crater talks to his friend and Maxima comes into play and is awesome. Vado gives Maxima something to do this issue, bless you comic, bless you. Atom gets Crater to realize that if Maxima is there, there’s likely more where that came from. Crater gets his team out of there and Captain Atom shows why he is the best leader for Extreme Justice.

From here on, I am going to be spoiling bits of a 20+ year old comic so here’s your warning.

Captain Atom and Maxima Extreme Justice DC Comics

Copyright: DC Comics

Even better with how Captain Atom handles the battle at their doorstep, he explains the reason behind Extreme Justice. That conversation should have happened with #0 but better now rather than later. Ted Kord as Blue Beetle is the speaker for the audience, he’s saying what we’re thinking about this team. A needed discussion that explains why Extreme Justice is even a thing. While #0 had many exciting moments, this is where I started to feel that Extreme Justice could start to truly connect with me. Dan Vado adding a few pages to illuminate the concept, that’s all it took.

So much makes sense now about Extreme Justice within the span of a few pages. Thank you Ted Kord.

Captain Atom and Blue Beetle Extreme Justice #1

Copyright: DC Comic

As a first time reader of Extreme Justice, I knew little to nothing about this. 90’s art was the only major thing I knew of this series. Never even knew who was on the team until I read #0. Now knowing why the team exists, this makes sense now. Take note of this, these pages I post here are why Ted Kord is one of the best DC characters no matter who writes him. Hence in the first recap why I said Dan Vado writes a good Ted Kord and he succeeds triumphantly with his characterization of him.

Take note, Dan Vado writes a good Captain Atom too.

Captain Atom and Ted Kord Extreme Justice #1 DC Comics

Firestorm/Ronnie Raymond’s story picks up a little more steam as he goes back to the Justice League Headquarters. Only he sees that the place is now gone and I was desperately wishing for an editorial note to tell me what happened. I was happy to see Oberon and Skeets though, Oberon being a classic of this period of Justice League and Skeets being Booster Gold’s Robot Pal. This was during the odd Booster Gold full armor period and editorial notes would be so nice to have right now. I digress a little though as this sets up Ronnie Raymond’s purpose in this series, to find a cure for his Leukemia with Skeets helping him to find the Extreme Justice team. Take note, I have no idea how the story ends so this will be fun for all of us.

The rest of the issue is Mount Thunder exploration time! Now we’re dealing with the rest of the people who are inside Mount Thunder with our oddball Justice League team. Early on I mentioned the Neighborhood and even the title page notes it, the place looks like Leave it to Beaver. Of course the massive battle that finishes off our comic is far from the peace this Neighborhood gives off. There’s only so much to dive into with the battle, it’s bonkers, it’s fun, and that’s the battle. Amazing-Man gets a few cool moments with his power and Maxima gets a little more to do. By the end though there is a classic what in the world moment in comics, Captain Atom is gone. Imagining the reactions of fans of this period sounds priceless right now.

The most horrible things happen to characters in classic sitcom settings.

Amazing-Man and Maxima Extreme Justice #1 DC Comics

Nearing the end of this article, you all are wanting me to comment on the art. Marc Campos is an artist of that period, but better than a lot of the Extreme artists of the time. Not saying the work is perfect but there are some great designs in the book, especially with the Beta Team near the end of the issue. The Neighborhood has a nice, classic feel to it that I personally enjoy. Yet poor Maxima, her body gets contorted in so many strange ways. Even the guys have issues but Maxima is where the issues are glaring. Ken Branch helps on the inking here, giving it a stronger look and Campos does improve with his panel work here too. Everything is much improved here. Want to know my favorite part of the art team? Lee Loughridge’s coloring is sensational. Great work with light and shadows and a lot of classic pop and sizzle within the action of the comic.

In this crazy life of ours at times seeing cool robot designs makes the universe brighter.

Extreme Justice #1 Marc Campos Robots

Time to close the book on Extreme Justice #1 and prepare myself for #2 in the meantime. Thank you all for reading my DC Extreme adventure, I appreciate the response so far. Trying to not go for the obvious snark and humor with this series is tough but fun. It’s nice to dive into a series that’s never been looked at with a semi-serious tone before but that’s what I’m attempting here. Stick with me on this ride as trust me, it’s only going to get more entertaining from here. Till next time, stay Extreme!

Same Extreme Time, Same Extreme Blog, Stay tuned to the geekwholanded.com for more Extreme Justice!

If you missed part of the DC Extreme, here’s what has been covered so far below!

DC Extreme: Extreme Justice #0

 

DC Extreme: Exploring Extreme Justice #0: Hello 90’s!

Extreme Justice #0 Cover

Extreme Justice is the oddest duck of the Justice League franchise. Starting in 1995, Captain Atom led a new Justice League made up of Blue Beetle, Booster Gold,  Amazing Man, and Maxima. In my research online on Extreme Justice they’re dedicated to being a more proactive team than the other Justice League teams at the time. Now if you’re wondering why the team is called Extreme Justice, it’s partially for the premise but also for the art style. Now many people with this comic take the route of snark with the 90’s art style. Growing up in this period of extreme 90’s art I find I have an odd appreciation for the art of the period. I’ve never read this before and it’s been in my curiosity pile for years. Since I’ve never read this, this should be a lot of fun. Surprises me that this somehow slipped by me back in the day. Prepare yourselves for a trip to a different time as we journey to the realm of the mid 90’s with Extreme Justice #0.

Welcome to DC Extreme with Extreme Justice #0!

Extreme Justice #0 Splash Page

Copyright: DC Comics, Writer: Dan Vado, Pencils: Marc Campos, Inker: Ken Branch, Colored by: Lee Loughridge, Letterer: Kevin Cunningham

Here’s the deal with Extreme Justice #0, you get no explanation as to how the team comes together. If you’re also wondering why this is #0, it came out during the Zero Hour event, which is a story for another day. Dan Vado doesn’t fill you in on anything involving how the team came together in the first place which threw me off initially. Now you understand why I did some research in understanding this team more. Extreme Justice came out of the Judgement Day crossover that happened in the Justice League titles. You don’t get to know why Captain Atom brought them together or what happened in Judgement day at all. You are thrown right into this and off to the races.

The lack of any explanation for the team makes the issue jarring at first. There’s a nuclear missile strike about to launch from the Rocky Mountains targeting Russia. As this is building you get a massive splash page introducing our heroes to the world. No explanation about the Extreme Justice team but I can’t deny that the splash page is wicked. The gritted teeth poses are on overdrive here outside of whatever pose Maxima is doing. The flying things that Blue Beetle and Amazing Man have are cool too and that can’t be denied.

What can I say? I’m a sucker for cool flying devices.

A lot of Dan Vado’s writing is actually not too bad here, it’s a little spastic and all over the place but readable. There’s fun banter with Ted Kord’s Blue Beetle being who he is and Vado has a good grasp on his character. Amazing-Man is someone I’m not as familiar with but his power to absorb energy is handy in a battle and used to good effect. Booster Gold gets a small moment, Maxima gets a moment, and then Captain Atom is power personified. Marc Campos goes mental with his art on Captain Atom, Vado wanted the audience to know he was powerful and Campos does that well art wise. The opening fight shows the power level of the team, outside of Blue Beetle who is the intelligence and fun of the team. It shows that Vado enjoys writing Ted Kord.

Dan Vado writes a strong Ted Kord and is one of the best parts of Extreme Justice thus far.

Extreme Justice #0 Captain Atom

Copyright: DC Comics

There’s a couple stories brewing already here, one with a mysterious figure and one with Ronnie Raymond (Firestorm) dealing with Leukemia. I know the Ronnie Raymond story sorts itself out down the way but I will be interested to see what this builds into. The same way with this mysterious figure that’s hanging out in the background. Marc Campos does good work in the Raymond bit as Campos dials it down and I like it. The headquarters of Mount Thunder that’s being built up is a fun idea and the story that’s happening in the next issue has my attention. The character of Mister Synge that was introduced as my attention and sounds like an entertaining villain.

Now for the rest of the art here, Ken Branch is a good inker for Marc Campos as the strong lines here helped the art immensely. It’s got some issues with spastic layouts here and there but Vado did craft a good story and Lee Loughridge’s coloring was nice, weird at points within Mount Thunder but nice. The art in the 90’s books is something people like to rip into but this has issues but it’s overall decent, not perfect but decent. Always remember, the 90’s were a strange and fascinating time for comic books.

If you have any feedback you’d like to give me as I go through Extreme Justice please do fire me a line! Either on my @GeekWhoLanded twitter or leave a comment below. Still working through the kinks how I will cover Extreme Justice as this goes forward. I’m planning on covering the entire series from start to finish. In any case thanks for reading and till next time, stay Extreme.

Same DC Extreme Time, Same DC Extreme Channel.

 

Wes Reads Deathstroke: Rebirth #1: Christopher Priest Returns to DC!

Deathstroke Rebirth #1 Cover

Copyright: DC Comics with Cover by ACO and Romulo Fajardo Jr.

In the New 52, DC had a tough time with an ongoing for one character in particular, Deathstroke. At his core Deathstroke is a tough character to build an ongoing around as by nature, he’s not easy to connect with. Yet with the right set up, Slade Wilson as Deathstroke can be a compelling read. I remember when the DC Rebirth announcements hit and Christopher Priest on Deathstroke surprised me. Deathstroke became a comic for me personally to get excited about because if this character is where Priest returns to an ongoing series, this has got to be good. Quietly I’ve been awaiting this comic and I’ve been waiting to see what Priest has in store for us as readers. I am surprised that they’re doing a Rebirth rather than going into a #1 but from reading this issue, I can see why a Rebirth issue was needed here. So does Priest have the magic touch once more to get readers hooked into Deathstroke? Well there’s only one way to find out, let’s dive into Deathstroke: Rebirth #1 and go back into the brutal world of Slade Wilson once more.

Deathstroke Rebirth Title Deathstroke the Professional

Copyright: DC Comics, Letterer: Willie Schubert

First off with Deathstroke: Rebirth #1, you can tell that this is a Christopher Priest comic from the get go. The black box with white text giving you the slightest hint of what you’re in for is that instant sign that this is a Priest book. You see Slade Wilson being a Dad, an awful Dad at points, but a Dad nonetheless. On the other hand you see Slade as Deathstroke and what mission he’s on right now. You get many sides of the character, Mercenary, Dad, and altogether a complete character study of sorts. Best part about Deathstroke: Rebirth is you don’t need to know that much about Deathstroke going into this. Priest is making a point to show all the sides of Slade Wilson and how he operates. For every moment that Slade has that second where he might not be so terrible, he immediately becomes terrible again. Slade Wilson is not a good person and Priest doesn’t shy away from that. Priest is starting off his run on Deathstroke by doing some amazing character work with him from the start. There’s a lot of action and intensity here but the character work here is top notch.

deathstroke-rebirth-dc-comics-priest-pagulayan-battle

Copyright: DC Comics Art Team: Pencils: Carlo Pagulayan, Inks: Jason Paz, Colorist: Jeromy Cox

You get a slow intro to Slade Wilson’s supporting cast in the book too, mostly Hosun his tech support, eventually Slade’s Kids, and another character I won’t mention because of spoilers. This isn’t a slow burn book by any means, yet Priest is making it clear, Deathstroke is the major focus and everything else is forming around him. This isn’t a light book either, some humorous moments yet but this book is dark without a doubt. Which shows in the art of the series, Carlo Pagulayan, Jason Paz, and Jeromy Cox, make for a powerhouse art team here. It’s realistic, and tough as nails art and I like it. Pagulayan has a style fit for Slade’s world, it’s tough and suited for the fluid action scenes here. Paz’s inks add a tight line to the work, giving extra emphasis to Pagulayan’s art making it that much stronger. Jeromy Cox’s colors are muted for this, this is not a bright and shiny world that we’re in here and the colors show it. I would say the brightest coloring in the comic is the desert as Slade Wilson is talking to his current employer in the bright desert but the horrors around him are shaded in hushed and dark tones. The art for this series fits the character and sets the mood for darker things to come.

Deathstroke: Rebirth sets up Slade Wilson as a genuine bad guy and that’s amazing. No gimmicks, nothing fancy, just Slade Wilson being Slade Wilson. This is a back to basics for Slade Wilson and it’s been sorely needed. Now this may not be a series everyone will end up digging, this isn’t a light read by any means but it is good reading for sure if you’re into it. It adds more than a couple cool ideas into Slade’s world and I can’t help but like that. If you’re a big Deathstroke fan or just want a good tough action series, look no further than Deathstroke: Rebirth.

The DC Rebirth Journey: Wes Reads Week Two of DC Rebirth

Detective Comics #934 DC Rebirth Cover

DC Rebirth marks one of the biggest surprises I have had as a comic fan in a long time. Week One of DC Rebirth was overall successful, at least for me. Now we are onto week two and what an adventure it is. I’m going to be keeping with this format covering DC Rebirth as since I am reading them all; at least for now. Until then enjoy these massive posts detailing my thoughts on the whole DC Rebirth adventure week to week. For Week Two we have Action Comics, Detective Comics, Aquaman, Wonder Woman, and The Flash. All of these worked in their own way to set the scene for DC Rebirth. I’m here to sort it out in my own head as well as tell you all if they’re worth reading. There’s a lot happening here and I’m happy to take you along for the ride. If you’re coming from Week One, thanks for returning, and if you’re on board for the first time with Week Two, welcome and I am happy to have you here!  Welcome to Week Two of The DC Rebirth Journey, come along as I explore this second week of DC Rebirth.

(Small Warning there may be mild spoilers for the books in these reviews, the Wonder Woman is the one that has some mild spoiler material.)

Aquaman: Rebirth #1 Cover DC RebirthAquaman: Rebirth #1

The one book out of this entire week that made me scratch my head a lot was Aquaman: Rebirth. Dan Abnett was doing what I call Geoff Johns lite. Making a point to show how great Aquaman is and this time around having Mera as part of the story. It’s a decent read, not perfect but decent enough of a read. It is showing that Aquaman is in a better place with Mera by his side for starters. With The Deluge as a new threat in his life as King of Atlantis, it’s a cool idea yet doesn’t quite work as well as I thought it would. Yet the coolest part of this was the ending as there is a constant narration by a classic character that works wonders in increasing interest for this series. I’m not one hundred percent sold on Aquaman at least yet. This is one where I’m not sure if I’ll get the first issue of the ongoing series. I must say though, I did enjoy the art of Scot Eaton and Oscar Jimenez, it looked good with some rocking inks by Mark Morales and Jimenez himself doing inks as well. I do say that Gabe Eltaeb’s coloring set this book off on the right foot, beautiful coloring throughout this comic. While the story isn’t working fully for me yet, the art helped this along for sure.

The Flash: Rebirth #1 CoverThe Flash: Rebirth #1

The Flash was a tough book to judge, probably the toughest of week two. For starters this felt like an epilogue for DC Universe: Rebirth. It’s a good continuation of the events of DC Universe: Rebirth but you only get a loose idea of where The Flash is heading. Josh Williamson does excellent work with Barry Allen and setting Wally West up on his adventures in the upcoming Titans series. As a proper story for The Flash on his own, this is an odd one. It’s not bad by any means and if you want to see more of where the DC Universe and DC Rebirth is going, The Flash: Rebirth does that in spades. If you’re looking for a stand alone Flash story though, this is not it. I do find myself liking this though as overall it is a good read. Williamson gave me just enough to get me to want to try the first issue of The Flash series. I will say though Carmine Di Giandomenico’s art is a show stopper here showing that this series is going to look phenomenal as the action here is amazing, with spot on emotional touches to the work. Ivan Plascencia’s color work here is impressive too, bright, colorful, and at points moody in the right places. I’m willing to stick it out with this book, there is just enough here to keep me interested.

 

DC Rebirth Wonder Woman Punch

 

Wonder Woman: Rebirth #1 DC Comics CoverWonder Woman: Rebirth #1

Out of all the series in DC Rebirth thus far, Wonder Woman: Rebirth was the big one. Greg Rucka returning to Wonder Woman is a major event in itself and if it didn’t work there would have been a major letdown. Luckily in this case Wonder Woman: Rebirth was not a letdown and turned out to be a successful return. Rucka is doing serious deep diving into the history of Wonder Woman. Her continuity has always been a mess and that’s being polite. Hence why Greg Rucka is now using every single bit of Wonder Woman and putting it into this story. I now have a new term called Wonder Woman Punch as with one punch you see every bit of her quirky continuity appear before you. It makes for a cool effect and shows that Greg Rucka means business with this new run. This is one that I’m glad I’ve taken a few days with and I find myself excited for where he is going to take her character. It’s also a great looking book, Matthew Clark and Sean Parsons make for a great art team handling most of the issue, that double page spread with Wonder Woman Punch alone seals the deal. Then you see Liam Sharp handling the art for the last few pages and we are in for a treat to say the least as these pages were amazing. Then you get the strong colors of Jeremy Colwell on the Clark and Parsons pages and Laura Martin’s coloring on Liam Sharp and hands down this book is breathtaking.  At the end of the day, this comic is all about finding The Truth about Wonder Woman and I’m looking forward to seeing where this goes.

Action Comics #957 DC Rebirth CoverAction Comics #957

Now we have Action Comics returning back to its original numbering as the push to Action Comics #1000 begins! I have to say with Action Comics that this lived up to the name for sure. It was action packed and Dan Jurgens made a point to shove in as much as he could into this issue. You get the official return of Pre-52 Superman into his costume and his meeting with Lex Luthor as his own version of Superman. We get some good character moments with Pre-52 Superman and Lex Luthor, as Luthor in this Earth hasn’t met this Superman yet. A good and definitely smash and bash filled dynamic is starting already with Pre-52 Superman and Lex. I did enjoy the family dynamic happening here, Pre-52 Superman, Lois, and his son Jon are a blast to see together. I also enjoyed how Lex set his appearance as the new Superman up, it was enjoyable. It’s a little rocky though as so far we’re only given so much to go on. As I said, there is a lot shoved into this issue and you don’t get a chance to really dive into anything. The ending was a nice touch though so I’m willing to give this more time to gel together. I will say though that Patrick Zircher’s art is on a new level, excellent work especially with the Lex vs. Superman fight, so much high intensity action that was a joy to see on the page. I liked the coloring here too, Tomeu Morey does excellent with capturing the energy lying within Action Comics as the colors look amazing and pop off of these pages. Good if not slightly rocky start so far. Giving it a couple issues to see where it goes.

Detective Comics #934 DC Rebirth CoverDetective Comics #934

The other book that begins the run to #1000 is Detective Comics #934. Not even going to hide it, this was my favorite book of all the DC Rebirth releases for Week Two. James Tynion IV is going full speed ahead with this story and I love it to pieces. Batman and Batwoman are starting a boot camp of sorts for the vigilantes of Gotham with Clayface along for the ride. The way this all comes together is smooth and without a single hitch. This is one book that clicked from the get go and got even better as the issue neared the end, I wanted more and that is a good sign. The new threat that is rising that sets up Batman and Batwoman doing this is compelling, I am so excited by this series. Clayface is going to steal the show I get the feeling as he is such an unlikely but lovable new member to the Bat-family. It doesn’t hurt that also Eddy Barrows and Eber Ferreira are doing some of the best work I have seen out of them, especially in the Clayface sequence, if the writing didn’t break your heart, the art will make you want to hug Clayface.  Adriano Lucas does brilliant work on the colors here too, I love the mood set with them. Clayface having this almost watercolor feel at point, and you can’t help but get lost in this world. Detective Comics #934 is excellent and I recommend grabbing that as soon as you can.

 

Week Two of DC Rebirth was a rousing success overall, some parts didn’t work as well but for the most part a lot of great reads. It is weird to admit but I really did miss collecting DC Comics on a regular basis and love being back in the DC Universe again. Keep an eye out for Week Three of DC Rebirth later this week and until then thanks for joining me on my DC Rebirth Journey.

Wes Reads Totally Awesome Hulk #1-4: Giant Monsters are Radical!

Totally Awesome Hulk #1 Cover

Totally Awesome Hulk comes to us from the All-New All-Different Marvel launch late last year and just completed its first story arc, what a perfect time to check it out. I have been curious about this series and when Greg Pak put out the call on twitter for reviewers to review story arcs, I was totally game to do it. To fill in the story for you all, Greg Pak brings Amadeus Cho, the character he co-created with Takeshi Miyazawa, to the forefront as now he is the Totally Awesome Hulk. Yet you wonder what happened to Bruce Banner, why isn’t he The Hulk? What the heck happened between this book and Secret Wars? With an eight month gap, a lot of stuff happened in the Marvel Universe, Amadeus Cho’s transformation being one such thing. If I had only read one issue of this, I probably wouldn’t have gotten the full idea of what Pak was going for here. In reading the entire first story arc, there is a sense that Pak is taking the Amadeus Cho Hulk in directions that managed to surprise me. Totally Awesome Hulk is a different take on the character of The Hulk. Time to see more of what happens when the eighth smartest person in the Marvel Universe embraces the art of Hulk Smash in issues #1-4 of Totally Awesome Hulk!

Take note of the title of this Wes Reads, Giant Monsters are Radical. The entire first arc is Amadeus Cho our Totally Awesome Hulk, going after giant monsters, this has my heart from the start. Yet even more than that, Pak adds a great supporting cast with Amadeus Cho’s sister Maddy, short for Madame Curie, and her working with Amadeus as his Mission Control for his work as the Hulk. You even have Miles Morales Spider-Man and She-Hulk popping up in the rest of the arc too. You get a great supporting cast, strong characterization, and even non-stop action to boot. The major villain of this first arc are the giant monsters, specifically Fin Fang Foom who is my favorite thanks to Nextwave. I really do like Lady Hellbender, she’s after the Giant Monsters for her own reasons and she would be considered the villain yet she’s really not a bad person. She has her reasons and she also helps out too. It’s a unique idea to have your first story arc be about exploring the new status quo through a fun giant monster adventure and a powerful origin story, I dig what Pak did with this.

Spider-Man and She-Hulk with Totally Awesome Hulk

It’s also built for Frank Cho to cut loose, and Frank Cho cuts loose on this comic. This is loud splashy action at its finest. Amadeus Cho shows all his skills as the Totally Awesome Hulk in this comic. The giant monsters feel huge and powerful, the Fin Fang Foom fight and the giant monster battle near the end have to be seen to be believed. Though as you see lots of Hulk Smashing all over the place in these big bombastic action pieces, Frank Cho excels at those quiet moments where you get to know the characters a bit. Cho’s style is so expressive that even in the slow moments, it still has a sense of keeping the story moving forward. There’s a bit in the flashback sequences that thanks to Cho’s art that will break your heart in two, it’s touching and powerful all at once. Pak nails you with the emotional words then Cho knocks it out of the park with the emotions on each of the characters faces, it’s about as perfect a comic moment as you can get. I love Sonia Oback’s coloring on this, I note that in the present day there’s a brightness to the coloring then in the flashback there is a more muted tone, highlighting the more serious nature of the flashbacks. That nice subtle difference in coloring makes all the difference in making a comic like this work that much more.

Totally Awesome Hulk vs. Fin Fang Foom

I’m making this spoiler free too because Totally Awesome Hulk is a lot of fun and there’s touches that I won’t dare spoil for you all. Put it this way, Pak has another twist with the Amadeus Cho Hulk that Frank Cho has a lot of fun with that’s subtle and it works. I hadn’t gotten the chance to read anything of Totally Awesome Hulk and now I am planning on reading the next issue. There’s great characters developing here and I still feel like we’re only scratching the surface with the Totally Awesome Hulk. Right now the future of The Hulk looks bright and in the hands of this creative team, I have high hopes for the rest of the series to come.

Now to get your hands on the Totally Awesome Hulk for yourselves you can likely find it at your local comic shop and if you don’t know where your local store is just use the Comic Shop Locator to help find the comic store closest to you. If you prefer digital it is also available on ComiXology, and if you want to grab the upcoming trade of these issues you can even pre-order it off of Amazon.